GREG BEST - 07-02-14 - STADIUM JUMPING PRELIM COURSES  The total running time of parts five through eight of this video is one hour.  Greg Best concludes this Prelim group lesson with course work.


Part 5: This group now goes on to jump courses, with Greg first describing the way to ride the lines. The first rider to go has been working on keeping her horse from dropping his inside shoulder on the approach to the fence, and when he rubs it the first time they redo it with great results. Greg analyzes the rest of their ride and talks about how much better the horse is going in this different bit. With the second rider they talk about helping her horse be quicker off the ground and how her body position affects that. His goals for her are to keep the horse round and motivated.
Part 6: They continue with talking about the bit the second horse is using, considering whether a pelham or a snaffle would work better. The third rider has a more reactive horse, and Greg helps her find a ride that will improve her course. The second time she rides the course it is much quieter, but Greg still asks for some fine tuning. After a third go, he talks about the use of the voice to give the horse a heads up that the hands are going to be used.
Part 7: Greg has the first rider go again while the third rider changes to a rubber bit. They use the voice at great places to create a better ride, with a much better round. The corner after an in and out provides the greatest challenge, and Greg talks about how to smooth that out. Greg has the rider working on getting the right canter for jumping. The round goes fine until the last line when they have trouble with the lead change. Watch for how Greg has them work through this. He has them repeat part of the course, and interestingly enough, put a more positive ride on the bank up.
Part 8: Now that the last rider has changed bits, they have another go at the course, and Greg point out to them that he probably does not need a stronger bit than this one, and why this one works. Greg gives great insight into riding a more sensitive Thoroughbred through the course.
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